The spaniards genocide in the new world portrayed in a short account of the destruction of the indie

However, much has happened since it went up, including the Blogger outage. Scroll down for a report on that. More new posts will be added below this one. The essay below is the conclusion of the ninth part in a series by Takuan Seiyo.

The spaniards genocide in the new world portrayed in a short account of the destruction of the indie

But Columbus was not one of them Christopher Columbus carried ideas that boded ill for Indies natives. They had been looking for it—they knew it existed—and, familiar as they were with oceans, they had no difficulty in recognizing it when they saw it.

On their way, however, they saw a good many things they had not been looking for and were not familiar with. When they returned to Spain to tell what they had seen, it was not a simple matter to find words for everything. They called it a tiger, although there were no tigers in Spain and none of the men had ever seen one before.

How, the learned man asked them, did they know that the ferocious animal was a tiger? They answered "that they knewe it by the spottes, fiercenesse, agilitie, and such other markes and tokens whereby auncient writers have described the Tyger.

Men, confronted with things they do not recognize, turn to the writings of those who have had a wider experience. And in it was still assumed that the ancient writers had had a wider experience than those who came after them.

Columbus himself had made that assumption. His discoveries posed for him, as for others, a problem of identification.

It seemed to be a question not so much of giving names to new lands as of finding the proper old names, and the same was true of the things that the new lands contained. Cruising through the Caribbean, enchanted by the beauty and variety of what he saw, Columbus assumed that the strange plants and trees were strange only because he was insufficiently versed in the writings of men who did know them.

Only idiots escape entirely from the world that the past bequeaths. The discovery of America opened a new world, full of new things and new possibilities for those with eyes to see them. But the New World did not erase the Old. Rather, the Old World determined what men saw in the New and what they did with it.

What America became after depended both on what men found there and on what they expected to find, both on what America actually was and on what old writers and old experience led men to think it was, or ought to be or could be made to be.

During the decade beforeas Columbus nursed a growing urge to sail west to the Indies—as the lands of China, Japan and India were then known in Europe—he was studying the old writers to find out what the world and its people were like.

Columbus was not a scholarly man. Yet he studied these books, made hundreds of marginal notations in them and came out with ideas about the world that were characteristically simple and strong and sometimes wrong, the kind of ideas that the self-educated person gains from independent reading and clings to in defiance of what anyone else tries to tell him.

The strongest one was a wrong one—namely, that the distance between Europe and the eastern shore of Asia was short, indeed, that Spain was closer to China westward than eastward. Columbus never abandoned this conviction. And before he set out to prove it by sailing west from Spain, he studied his books to find out all he could about the lands that he would be visiting.

From Marco Polo he learned that the Indies were rich in gold, silver, pearls, jewels and spices. The Great Khan, whose empire stretched from the Arctic to the Indian Ocean, had displayed to Polo a wealth and majesty that dwarfed the splendors of the courts of Europe.As a follow-up to Tuesday’s post about the majority-minority public schools in Oslo, the following brief account reports the latest statistics on the cultural enrichment of schools in Austria.

Vienna is the most fully enriched location, and seems to be in roughly the same situation as Oslo. Many thanks to Hermes for the translation from barnweddingvt.com Feb 09,  · 1.

De Las Casa’s account tells us about the vulnerability of the Indigenous people when facing the Spaniards conquest.

The spaniards genocide in the new world portrayed in a short account of the destruction of the indie

De Las Casa says the Indians were “poor, not arrogant or greedy” (page 1), conveying a sense of . Graphic history of the genocidal consequences of the discovery of the New World, along with the catastrophic effects of spreading of new diseases.

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The latter are sometimes used to cover the former, and the picture portrayed by the author is altogether horrifying, and a challenge to the systematic amnesia constructed around the facts, which.

If your view of the "new world" before its discovery by Europeans in the 's is one of natives living in elysian fields, plucking daisies, peeling grapes for each other and reciting poetry to an educated civilization, you will probably like this book. is and in to a was not you i of it the be he his but for are this that by on at they with which she or from had we will have an what been one if would who has her.

In , the th anniversary of Columbus's arrival in the New World was marked with a deluge of movies, documentaries and T.V. dramas. Not only is this the best of those commemorative re-tellings, it is also a lesson in how good historical movies should be .

Columbus' Confusion About the New World | Travel | Smithsonian